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  • 07 Jan 19

    Vitamin D (VitD) deficiency is prevalent in patient with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent studies have found that VitD can induce and maintain IBD remission through antibiosis, anti-inflammatory, and repair of intestinal mucosal barriers, thus improving the patient's disease activity and quality-of-life. This meta-analysis evaluated the therapeutic effect and safety of VitD in the treatment of IBD (1). The results showed that eighteen RCTs involved 908 patients were included. The authors conclude that the treatment of VitD in patients with IBD can improve the level of 25(OH)D3 and control the relapse rate of the disease, whose clinical curative effect is more accurate. Thus VitD should be recommended for the treatment of IBD, at least as an adjunctive treatment.

  • 07 Jan 19

    This meta-analysis investigated 9 randomized trials with regards to whole grain consumption and the concentration of inflammatory markers (1). The results showed that totally 9 randomized trials included 838 participants were identified. In a pooled analysis of all studies, consumption of whole grains had an inverse association with inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein (CRP), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Specific analyses for CRP and IL-6 yielded that whole grain diet was related with a significant decrease in the concentration of CRP and IL-6. The authors conclude that citizens could benefit from increased whole grain intake for reducing systemic inflammation.

  • 07 Jan 19

    This systematic review examined the body of evidence on the efficacy of coenzyme Q10 supplementation in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) (1). All reviews were identified through a systematic search of the following databases: Cochrane, DARE, Ovid, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, and PubMed. The results showed that extracted data for seven systematic reviews for primary outcomes, net changes in cardiac output, cardiac index, New York Heart Association functional classification, improved survival, based on existing evidence, there is a case for use of CoQ10 as an adjunctive therapy in congestive heart failure, especially in those patients unable to tolerate mainstream medical therapies. The authors conclude that the evidence suggests that the CoQ10 supplement may be a useful tool for managing patients with heart failure.

  • 07 Jan 19

    Clinical trials examining the therapeutic benefit of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have reported inconsistent results. This study was a meta-analysis of trials (1). The results showed that eighteen studies involving 1424 patients were included. The authors found a significant benefit for ω-3 PUFAs vs control for liver fat, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, γ-glutamyl transferase, triglycerides, insulin resistance, and glucose. However, there was significant interstudy heterogeneity. The authors conclude that ω-3 PUFA supplementation may decrease liver fat and hepatic enzyme parameters.

  • 07 Jan 19

    In this network meta-analysis, the authors investigated different acupuncture methods on pain, stiffness, and function for osteoarthritis of the knee (1). A network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was searched from three English databases and one Chinese database until January 2018. A pairwise meta-analysis was performed with a random effects model. The results showed that 16 trials mostly researched short-term effectiveness and showed that fire needle and electro-acupuncture were statistically significant to decrease WOMAC pain and physical function scores when compared with other treatments, but there was no significant difference in stiffness calculations.

  • 05 Dec 18

    This case study reviewed an infant who required vitamin B12 to address numerous health problems (1). A vitamin B12 deficiency in infants is rare, but may sometimes be seen in breastfed babies of strict vegetarian mothers. Vitamin B12, also known as cobalamin, is only found in meat and other animal products. Most babies have a sufficient supply as long as the mother was not deficient herself. Symptoms and signs of vitamin B12 deficiency appear between the ages of 2 to 12 months and include vomiting, lethargy, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and arrest or regression of developmental skills. This article presents a case of vitamin B12 deficiency in a 9-month-old girl presented with psychomotor regression, hypotonia and lethargy.

  • 05 Dec 18

    Individualized metacognitive training (MCT+) is a novel psychotherapy that has been designed to specifically target delusional beliefs in people with psychosis (1). It works by developing an awareness of the implausible content of delusional beliefs, while also targeting the cognitive biases that contribute to their formation and maintenance. It was expected that MCT+ would lead to significantly greater reductions in delusional severity compared to a cognitive remediation (CR) active control condition. A total of 54 patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder and active delusions were randomized into four 2-hourly sessions.

  • 05 Dec 18

    In this article, the authors discuss the components of plants which have medicinal activity against cataracts (1). Cataract is an eye disease with clouding of the eye lens leading to disrupted vision, which often develops slowly and causes blurriness of the eyesight. Although the restoration of the vision in people with cataract is conducted through surgery, the costs and risks remain an issue. Botanical drugs have been evaluated for their potential efficacies in reducing cataract formation decades ago and major active phytoconstituents were isolated from the plant extracts. A literature search was synthesized from the databases. Selection of all manuscripts were based on inclusion and exclusion criteria together with analysis of publication year, plant species, isolated phytoconstituents, and evaluated cataract activities.

  • 05 Dec 18

    In this article, the authors review the evidence in using vitamin D to help with cardiovascular disease, in patients with chronic kidney disease (1). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is considered an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen even in the early stages of CKD. Several studies have shown a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in individuals with CKD. Low vitamin D levels upregulate the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), cause endothelial dysfunction, and increase inflammation. Epidemiological studies show an association between vitamin D deficiency and risk factors for cardiovascular disease, but a causal relationship has not been established.

  • 05 Dec 18

    This review article discusses the use of food rather than supplements (1). In the past, vitamins and minerals were used to cure deficiency diseases. Supplements nowadays are used with the aim of reducing the risk of chronic diseases of which the origins are complex. Dietary supplement use has increased over recent decades, contributing to the nutrient intake in the population, but not necessarily the proportion of the population that is sub-optimally nourished; therefore, not reducing the proportion below the estimated average requirement and potentially increasing the number at risk of an intake above the safety limits. The supplement nutrient intake may be objectively monitored using circulation biomarkers.

  • 02 Nov 18

    This review article discusses the Mediterranean diet for veterans as a possible basis for good health (1). Veterans with disability represent a big burden worldwide and often require long-term rehabilitation. Unhealthy dietary and lifestyle habits, including smoke and alcohol abuse, are common in veterans. The Mediterranean diet has been suggested as a natural, non-pharmacological nutraceutical for healthy ageing. Although there is a broad consensus on the positive effect of plant foods consumption, the presence of glucosinolates, flavonoids and furanocoumarins in some plant foods and beverages must be taken into consideration owing to their potential interfering with drugs metabolism and bioavailability. A personalized nutrition is recommended in veterans who are in treatment for comorbidities.

  • 02 Nov 18

    This study investigated the recent studies that show different mechanisms through which vitamin C can be used as a preventative or a therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori related infections (1). The treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induced infections using antibiotic therapies is clinically well accepted; however, using a noninvasive approach with the implementation of therapeutic agents such as vitamin C is not well investigated. Vitamin C has certain characteristics, which allow for it to be considered as a potential treatment option for patients with H. pylori infections. Vitamin C's hostility and mechanism of action towards H. pylori infection in peptic ulcer disease can be classified into two categories: as a preventative agent and alternatively as a therapeutic agent.

  • 02 Nov 18

    The objective of this study was to describe the observed changes in nutrient intakes following a 3-month anti-inflammatory diet, and to explore potential relationships between the change in nutrients and the change in various inflammatory mediators (1). The treatment group demonstrated a significant reduction in fat intake, a significant increase in protein intake and no change in carbohydrates or energy intake. The treatment group showed a significant increase in some nutrients with established anti-inflammatory properties including vitamins A, C, and E, and omega-3 fatty acids. Significant reductions in proinflammatory nutrients were observed including trans fatty acids, caffeine, and sodium. The treatment group also showed significant reductions in the proinflammatory mediators.

  • 02 Nov 18

    Tryptophan is an essential plant-derived amino acid that is needed for the in vivo biosynthesis of proteins. After consumption, it is metabolically transformed to bioactive metabolites, including serotonin, melatonin, kynurenine, and the vitamin niacin (nicotinamide). This review surveys and interprets our current knowledge of the reported multiple analytical methods for free and protein-bound tryptophan in pure proteins, protein-containing foods, and in human fluids and tissues, the nutritional significance of l-tryptophan and its isomer d-tryptophan in fortified infant foods and corn tortillas as well the possible function of tryptophan in the diagnosis and mitigation of multiple human diseases (1).

  • 02 Nov 18

    This systematic review and meta-analysis examined the effects of probiotic supplementation in children for functional constipation (1). They included 4 trials reporting data on 382 children with functional constipation. Overall, there were no significant differences in treatment success, spontaneous bowel movements per week, fecal soiling episodes per week, straining at defecation, use of lactulose, use of laxatives, fecal incontinence, pain during defecation, flatulence, and adverse events between probiotics and placebo. Further, the use of probiotics was associated with lower frequency of glycerin enema use and abdominal pain. The authors conclude that the use of probiotics was associated with significant improvement in glycerin enema use and abdominal pain but did not affect the treatment success and other function indices.